Posts Tagged Mayor Danilo O. Leyble

Business Mirror: Alliance of 6 works to bring Marikina watershed to life

Alliance of 6 works to bring Marikina watershed to life

TUESDAY, 19 OCTOBER 2010 11:38

JONATHAN L. MAYUGA / CORRESPONDENT

PAGE B4

A 33.3-Hectare of what used to be barren and practically lifeless part of a rainforest known as the Marikina Watershed in Sitio Boso-Boso in Antipolo City, Rizal is now a haven for a growing Philippine flora and fauna, some of which are rare and threatened with extinction.

It took a decade for the forest to regenerate—thanks to a reforestation project initiated by the United Coconut Planters Bank (UCPB) in 1990, which saw the planting of and nurturing of 42,000 trees in the project site, somehow providing a ray of hope for the rehabilitation of the watershed.

A year after tropical storm Ondoy ravaged Luzon and Metro Manila, efforts to rehabilitate the Marikina Watershed were initiated by various stakeholders led by local government units in partnership with citizens group.

Last month, Marikina City Mayor Del R. de Guzman led fellow local chief executives namely Robert Eusebio of Pasig City, Metro Manila; Danilo O. Leyble of Antipolo City, Ramon A Ilagan of Cainta City, Cecilio Hernandez of Rodriguez, and Jose Rafael Diaz of the Municipality of San Mateo, all in the Province of Rizal in signing a memorandum of agreement, pledging to work together to rehabilitate and sustainably develop the Marikina Watershed.

The partnership called Alliance of Six, is working with citizens groups under RESILIENCE: Nurturing Disaster-Ready Cities and Communities, a consortium formed by the H. R. Morales Management and Consulting Corp., Education for Life Foundation, La Liga Policy Institute (La Liga), the Philippine Rural Reconstruction Movement, and Convergence for Community-Centered Area Development.

The Marikina Watershed is a 28,000-hectare of what used to be “rainforests” situated in Antipolo, San Mateo and Rodriguez.  Today, only 20 percent of the rainforest remains.  It was identified as the source of most of the flood waters that severely affected Rizal and parts of Metro Manila during “Ondoy.” The typhoon killed hundreds of people and destroyed billions of pesos worth of property.

Through THE UCPB-Coconut Industry Investment Fund (CIIF) Foundation, efforts to save the Marikina Watershed had started as part of the bank’s corporate social responsibility initiatives.

A full-time forester was hired to manage the reforestation project, including the establishment of an on-site tree nursery and holding annual treks for employees of UCPB, its subsidiaries and affiliate companies.

A recent biodiversity survey of the site, private conservation group Haribon Foundation found 108 species of trees, shrubs, palms, herbs and ferns; 53 species of birds, six species of mammals and seven species of amphibians and reptiles.

Haribon recorded 19 more new animal species than were reported in previous surveys of the area, which suggests that the successful reforestation of the area is giving rise to a thriving wildlife.

Among the notable bird species that the Haribon team observed during its survey are the Philippine Serpent-Eagle, the Indigo-banded Kingfisher, the Red-bellied Pitta, the Mangrove Blue Flycatcher, the Philippine Hawk-Owl and the Ashy Thrush.  The latter two are significant finds since they can be found only in the Philippines and both face serious threat of extinction owing to habitat loss.

The mammal population on the site has grown as well. Civet cats or Musang and chattering groups of long-tailed macaques or unggoy now roam the reforested area.

Haribon noted the presence of fruit bats as very encouraging since they “play a pivotal role in the ecology of the forest ecosystem” as pollinators and seed dispersers.  Another bat specie, the flat-headed Bat, which is one of the smallest in the world measuring only 5 centimeters in length, has made the bamboo groves on the site its home.

Of the seven species of amphibians and reptiles that the Haribon team saw on the site, the most exciting sighting is the Dimunitive Forest Frog (DFF).  The smallest frog specie in the country, the DFF is endemic to Luzon and is classified as rare and near-threatened.  Three other frog species, flying lizards, skinks or bubuli and Philippine cobras also abound in the area.

Haribon has recommended the planting of indigenous tree species to further enhance the reforestation site’s biodiversity.

The conservation group said increasing biodiversity will enable the site to support an even greater variety of plant and animal life.

The UCPB-CIIF Foundation, which oversees the maintenance of the reforested site has so far organized two treks for UCPB Group employees to do just that, planting four kinds of indigenous tree species on selected areas within the site.

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources declared UCPB’s reforestation area as a “Model Reforestation Site” in 2007.  The program also won the Asia CSR Award for environmental excellence in 2004 and the Asian Banking Awards for best environmental program by a financial institution in region in 2000.

Retrieved from:http://www.businessmirror.com.ph/component/content/article/53-agri-commodities/2630-alliance-of-6-works-to-bring-marikina-watershed-to-life

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Manila Bulletin: P250 M Sought for Rehab of Marikina Watershed

P250 M Sought for Rehab of Marikina Watershed

By MARVYN BENANING

October 5, 2010, 5:48pm

Page B-10

MANILA, Philippines — The La Liga Policy Institute (La Liga) has asked Congress to approve a budget of P250 million for the rehabilitation of the Marikina Watershed to prevent a repeat of the disastrous floods brought about by typhoon Ondoy last year.

La Liga, a nongovernmental organization involved in environmental issues and concerns, is also calling on the appropriations committee of the House of Representatives to approve an additional budget of P7.4 billion for the environment and natural resources sector.

Jonathan Ronquillo, La Liga environment campaigner, said apart from dredging the Laguna de Bay, the rehabilitation of the Marikina Watershed is a must since a total of four million metric tons (MMT) of silt from the watershed down to the tributaries of the Pasig River and then on to Napindan Channel, based on the estimate of Environment Secretary Ramon J. Paje.

Paje said he wants Baggerwerken Decloedt en Zoon (BDC), the Belgian firm that bagged the contract to dredge the 94,900-hectare Laguna de Bay to assist in upland reforestation before a notice to proceed (NTP) could be issued to the company for the P18.7 billion project.

Latest reports indicated BDC is amenable to the idea, along with the mayors of Pasig, Marikina, Cainta and San Mateo, all of whom have pledged to assist in every way they can to reforest the watershed, only 20 percent of which is actually in Marikina.

Marikina sustained the heaviest damage due to typhoon Ondoy, with scores of people killed, thousands uprooted and billions worth of property and livelihood lost.

Ronquillo said the extra P7.4 billion is needed since the past administration allegedly failed to arrest the continuing degradation of the environment. He added the new administration is now compelled to do some catching up, not only to hit important Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) targets related to Goal 7 or Environmental Sustainability, but to prepare the country from more intensifying typhoons, like Ondoy and Pepeng, or long-season of drought.

Retrieved from:

http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/280483/p250-m-sought-rehab-marikina-watershed

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Tempo: Congress asked to OK watershed rehab budget

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Business Mirror: Six affected LGUs want rehabilitation of Marikina watershed to prevent another ‘Ondoy’

Six affected LGUs want rehabilitation of Marikina watershed to prevent another ‘Ondoy’

Written by Jonathan L. Mayuga / Correspondent

TUESDAY, 28 SEPTEMBER 2010

PAGE A5

SIX local government units (LGUs) are pushing for the rehabilitation and development of the Marikina watershed as part of its disaster-management plan.

The Marikina watershed is 28,000 hectares of what used to be a “rain forest” partly situated in three cities in the province of Rizal, namely, Antipolo, San Mateo and Rodriguez.

Roughly around 20 percent of the rain forest remain.

The degradation of the Marikina watershed is being blamed for the flash floods that devastated Rizal and parts of Metro Manila during Typhoon Ondoy, which killed hundreds of people and destroyed billions worth of property nationwide.

Local government leaders—led by Marikina City Mayor Del de Guzman, Mayors Robert Eusebio of Pasig City, Danilo Leyble of Antipolo City, Ramon Ilagan of Cainta City, Cecilio Hernandez of Rodriguez and Jose Rafael Diaz of the San Mateo—vowed to jointly work together to prepare their respective cities for another supertyphoon and flash floods by protecting what remains of the rain forests and promote the use and sustainable development of the watershed.

Nongovernment organizations under Resilience: Nurturing Disaster-Ready Cities and Communities, a consortium formed by the H. R. Morales Management and Consulting Corp., Education for Life Foundation, La Liga Policy Institute, the Philippine Rural Reconstruction Movement, and Convergence for Community-Centered Area Development (Convergence), are facilitating technical support to formalize the LGU alliance.

Resilience—a group established to help LGUs enhance their capacities on disaster-risk reduction—recognizes that development initiatives toward climate risk-sensitive development plans and budgets require effective partnerships among national government agencies, LGUs, technical experts, private sector and citizens’ groups.

It also recognizes the various avenues for participation that can be explored in existing public-private partnerships, both at the national and LGU levels, which are working on disaster management and climate-sensitive development planning.

Roland Cabigas, managing director of La Liga, said the local chief executives of the “Alliance of Six” LGUs, recognize that the devastation wrought by typhoons Ondoy and Pepeng in the last quarter of 2009 is “beyond territorial boundaries,” hence, requires interlocal cooperation and partnership among LGUs, the private sector, citizens’ groups and other stakeholders.

Through the alliance, local chief executives of Marikina and Pasig, in Metro Manila, and Antipolo; San Mateo, Cainta and Rodriguez in Rizal vowed to work together to improve coordination, pool and share knowledge and resources to provide appropriate and timely interventions to prevent disaster, he said.

Among the areas for cooperation are the establishment of in-city development plans and proactive disaster readiness and response program; development of a unified and coordinated interlocal responses and mechanisms framed within a sustainable and climate-sensitive development plan for Marikina watershed and its environment; promotion of partnership mechanism among LGUs and key stakeholders in the six identified areas.

Cooperation will also be made in crafting of innovative LGU approaches and models for effective governance; harmonization of policy among local governments to facilitate effective responses to disaster and risk reduction measures; and mobilization and sharing of resources for immediate and medium-term project and program interventions.

Officials of Marikina City recently forged ties with the private sector to boost the city’s disaster preparedness as the city braces for stronger typhoons, floods and other natural calamities, with de Guzman and Vice Mayor Jose Fabian Cadiz signing a memorandum of agreement with private-sector partners to create the Marikina Disaster Readiness Alliance at the Crowne Plaza Hotel on July 20.

Retrieved from:

http://www.businessmirror.com.ph/home/nation/1782-six-affected-lgus-want-rehabilitation-of-marikina-watershed-to-prevent-another-ondoy

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Business Mirror: Local govts, other agencies learn from Ondoy

Local govts, other agencies learn from Ondoy

Written by Jonathan Mayuga / Correspondent

SUNDAY, 26 SEPTEMBER 2010 09:56

ONE year ago today, Typhoon Ondoy ravaged the country, flooding Luzon and major parts of Metro Manila.

The flashfloods swept away and destroyed homes and killing hundreds of people who trapped inside their homes or caught as they fled toward safer ground as floodwater rose rapidly during the first six hours of heavy downpour on that fateful day.

Learning their lesson from their tragic experience from Ondoy, local governments severely affected by last year’s deluge are commemorating the tragedy by being more prepared for natural calamities.

Six local governments in eastern Metro Manila, along with four towns in the nearby province of Rizal vowed to work together to reduce the risk of disaster by being more caring and protective of their environment.

As part of the plan, local chief executives vow to protect, rehabilitate and promote the sustainable development of the Marikina Watershed, a 28,000-hectare rainforest, or at least, what was left of it after years of neglect and abuse.

Led by Marikina Mayor Del de Guzman, local chief executives namely Robert Eusebio of Pasig City; Danilo Leyble of Antipolo City, Ramon Ilagan of Cainta City, Cecilio Hernandez of Rodriguez, Rizal and Jose Rafael Diaz of San Mateo, Rizal will formalize their partnership during the launching of the Marikina Watershed Environs Integrated Resource Development Alliance (Alliance of Six) at the Roman Garden in Marikina City on Sunday.

The launching of the local government alliance will be highlighted by the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among the six mayors as part of their disaster preparedness plan.

Nongovernment organizations under Resilience: Nurturing Disaster-Ready Cities and Communities, a consortium formed by the H. R. Morales Management and Consulting Corp., Education for Life Foundation, La Liga Policy Institute (La Liga), the Philippine Rural Reconstruction Movement (PRRM), and Convergence for Community-Centered Area Development (Convergence) with the help and support of de Guzman facilitated technical support in the coming together of the local chief executives to form the alliance, which basically aims to help save the Marikina Watershed.

In the medium term, the alliance cooperating among themselves and with the assistance of prospective institutional partners from both the public and private sector will work to reverse the current state of the Marikina Watershed.

Enrile calls for national survival agenda

Senate President Juan Ponce Enrile meanwhile issued a call for the formation of a national survival agenda anchored on public finance and adaptation to climate change.

“We know about the terrible effects of climate change and we are aware that its impacts on the Philippines will worsen. Yet it is simply not enough to just name the problem,” said Enrile. “We need to identify long-term solutions to the climate crisis along with the means to fund programs that will allow our people to cope with the rapidly and dangerously changing climate.”

Enrile called for the retooling of the national budget to address the vulnerabilities of Filipino communities facing the projected increase in severity and frequency of extreme weather events. He is studying, and will file, a bill “that will create a survival fund for local governments in anticipation of worsening impacts such as rising sea levels, intense flooding and extreme precipitation.”

Enrile said the bill he will file is focused on supporting localities particularly exposed to the ravages of global warming. “Local governments are the first line of defense of hapless communities facing the effects of climate change. They need predictable, long-term and directly accessible sources of public finance that can fund their climate change adaptation programs.”

Retrieved from:

http://www.businessmirror.com.ph/home/top-news/1713-local-govts-other-agencies-learn-from-ondoy

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‘Alliance of Six’ – Metro, Rizal town mayors forge ties to save Marikina Watershed

GOVERNMENT effort to save the Marikina Watershed from further degradation will be getting the much needed boost as six local chief executives from eastern Metro Manila and nearby towns in the province of Rizal vow to jointly work together to rehabilitate and develop the 28,000-hectare rainforests.

Led by Marikina City Mayor Del R. de Guzman, local chief executives namely Robert Eusebio of Pasig City, Metro Manila; Danilo O. Leyble of Antipolo City, Ramon A Ilagan of Cainta City, Cecilio Hernandez of Rodriguez, and Jose Rafael Diaz of the Municipality of San Mateo, all in the Province of Rizal will formalize their partnership during the launching of the Marikina Watershed Environs Integrated Resource Development Alliance (Alliance of Six) at the Roman Garden in Marikina City on Sunday, in commemoration of “Ondoy” which devastated major parts of Luzon and Metro Manila exactly one year ago.

The launching of the LGU alliance will be highlighted by the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the six mayors as part of their disaster preparedness plan.

Nongovernment organizations under RESILIENCE: Nurturing Disaster-Ready Cities and Communities, a consortium formed by the H. R. Morales Management and Consulting Corporation (HRMMCC), Education for Life Foundation (ELF), La Liga Policy Institute (La Liga), the Philippine Rural Reconstruction Movement (PRRM), and Convergence for Community-Centered Area Development (CONVERGENCE) with the help and support of De Guzman facilitated technical support in the coming together of the local chief executives to form the alliance, which basically aims to help save the Marikina Watershed.

In the medium term, the alliance cooperating among themselves and with the assistance of prospective institutional partners from both the public and private sector will work to reverse the current state of the Markina Watershed.

However the alliance is also looking at a strategic perspective of transforming these six dynamic LGUs into a “metro within the metropolis” geared towards making their territories a hub for green development pursuing climate-sensitive local governance.

RESILIENCE recognizes that development initiatives toward climate risk-sensitive development plans and budgets require effective partnerships among national government agencies, LGUs, technical experts, private sector and citizens’ groups.

It also recognizes the various avenues for participation that can be explored in existing public-private partnerships, both at the national and LGU levels, which are working on disaster management and climate-sensitive development planning.

Roland Cabigas, managing director of La Liga said local chief executives of the  “Alliance of Six” LGUs, recognize that the devastation wrought by typhoons “Ondoy and Pepeng” in the last quarter of 2009  is “beyond territorial boundaries”, hence, requires inter-local cooperation and partnership among LGUs, the private sector, citizens’ groups and other stakeholders.

Among the areas for cooperation are the establishment of “in-city development plans and proactive disaster readiness and response program; development of a unified and coordinated inter-local responses and mechanisms framed within a sustainable and climate sensitive development plan for Marikina watershed and its environment; promotion of partnership mechanism among LGUs and key stakeholders in the six identified areas; crafting of innovative LGU approaches and models for effective governance;  harmonization of policy among local governments to facilitate effective responses to disaster and risk reduction measures; and mobilization and sharing of resources for immediate and medium-term project and program interventions.

The Marikina Watershed is a 28,000-hectare of what used to be “rainforests” situated in Antipolo, San Mateo and Rodriguez.  Today, only 20% of the rainforest remain.  It was identified as the source of most of the flood waters that severely affected Rizal and parts of Metro Manila during “Ondoy”, which killed hundreds of people and destroyed billions worth of property.

To prevent a repeat of the flashflood that severely affected their respective cities and municipalities, the local chief executives vowed to join hands to prevent its further degradation, rehabilitate and co-manage the use and the natural resource’s sustainable development in the future.

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Yahoo News: Cities Team Up to Protect Marikina River Watershed

Cities Team Up to Protect Marikina River Watershed

Manila Bulletin – Friday, September 24

MANILA, Philippines – Marikina and Pasig have teamed up with four local government units (LGUs) in Rizal to protect the Marikina Watershed and prevent a repeat of the severe flooding caused by typhoon Ondoy last year. Marikina City Mayor Del R. de Guzman, Pasig Mayor and Mayors Danilo O. Leyble of Antipolo City, Ramon A. Ilagan of Cainta City, Cecilio Hernandez of Rodriguez and Jose Rafael Diaz of San Mateo said they have sealed an alliance in preparation for the worst impacts of climate change like super typhoons and flashfloods, by working together to protect and promote the sustainable use and development of a rich natural resource common and beneficial to all – the Marikina Watershed. Non-government organizations (NGOs) under RESILIENCE: Nurturing Disaster-Ready Cities and Communities, a consortium formed by the H.R. Morales Management and Consulting Corp. (HRMMCC), Education for Life Foundation (ELF), La Liga Policy Institute (La Liga), the Philippine Rural Reconstruction Movement (PRRM), and Convergence for Community-Centered Area Development (CONVERGENCE), are facilitating technical support to formalize the LGU alliance. RESILIENCE recognizes that development initiatives toward climate risk-sensitive development plans and budgets require effective partnerships among national government agencies, LGUs, technical experts, private sector and citizens’ groups. It also recognizes the various avenues for participation that can be explored in existing public-private partnerships, both at the national and LGU levels, which are working on disaster management and climate-sensitive development planning. Roland Cabigas, managing director of La Liga said local chief executives of the “Alliance of Six” LGUs, recognize that the devastation wrought by typhoons “Ondoy and Pepeng” in the last quarter of 2009 is “beyond territorial boundaries.” Thus, inter-local cooperation and partnership among LGUs, the private sector, citizens’ groups and other stakeholders are needed to protect the watershed.

Retrieved from:

http://ph.news.yahoo.com/mb/20100924/tph-cities-team-up-to-protect-marikina-r-020e1c8_1.html?printer=1

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